History

Advanced GCE in History

Course Overview

When we study history, we investigate the lives of people in the past by using the evidence that survives. But we can never know everything about the past. If we are to get anywhere near the truth, we have to analyse this evidence, deal with the contradictions and ask awkward questions.

    Qualification Details

    • Qualification: Advanced GCE in History
    • Exam Board: OCR

     

    Course Teacher Profile

    Mr S. Berry

    Mr S. Berry

    CTL

    Mr Berry is the Curriculum Team Lead for History in the Amethyst Sixth Form

    Course Requirements

    To enrol for the A Level History course you must have the following…

    • History Grade 6
    • English Grade 5
    • Must have GCSE

    Year 1 Summary

    • The French Revolution and Napoleon 1774-1821 – a study of the causes of the French Revolution, its subsequent development, the Rise of Napoleon, his transformation of France, his military successes and ultimate downfall. (15% of the Course- 1 hour exam)
    • The Witchcraze of the 16th and 17th centuries- a study of the witchhunts in the 16th and 17th centuries in Britain, Europe and the wider world and the reasons why the belief in witches was rising at this time.

    Assessment Information

    AS History consists of 1 Paper, 2.5 hours long.

    Paper 1 – Written exam
    40% of the course.

    Year 2 Summary

    • Britain 1846-1918 – a study of the political struggle between William Gladstone and Benjamin Disraeli and the impact of the Rise of the Labour Party and the Liberal Reforms in the early twentieth century.

    Assessment Information

    A Level assessment consists of 1 Paper, 1.5 hours long and Independent Coursework- a 4,000 word essay/ coursework of the pupils choosing that is designed to allow pupils to demonstrate a far deeper level of understanding of a key historical debate whilst encouraging the essential academic skills required of further education.

    Careers and Next Steps

    • If you look at the kind of jobs people with qualifications in history do, there are obvious ones like museum work, archaeology, conservation and teaching. But there are many other jobs which you might not have expected to see: architect, banker, barrister, civil servant, economist, journalist, personnel officer, police officer, publisher, social worker, solicitor.

    Why so many?

    Because History is about people.

    • Real people, well known and unknown, good and bad, who face real situations, some of which are very like those we face today, some of which are very different. In history, you study their words and actions and try to work out their motives and beliefs.
    • Clearly this is useful in any job which involves understanding what makes people tick and how they are motivated.

    Because history is about investigation.

    • When we study history, we investigate the lives of people in the past by using the evidence that survives. But we can never know everything about the past. If we are to get anywhere near the truth, we have to analyse this evidence, deal with the contradictions and ask awkward questions.
    • Clearly this is a useful skill in any job, which involves weighing up arguments, sifting a mass of material and reaching a conclusion.

    Because history is about communication.

    • When people who study history have investigated a past situation and evaluated the available evidence, they have to communicate their conclusions to others. This means putting together a clear explanation in an organised way and using the evidence to support the points made. This is often, but not always, in writing.
    • Clearly this useful in any job which involves explaining something to others, preparing and presenting a report or justifying decisions.

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